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Women in the Vedic Field

Creating harmonious social balance

By Gauri Mataji Devi

The Hindu tradition is famous for its consideration and respect for women, manifested not only in the traditional worship of the female forms of Godhead, both benevolent and terrible (saumya and asaumya), but also in the veneration for all women, starting from one’s Mother, as well as for Mother Cow and Mother Earth.

In the Taittiriya Upanisad (1.11.2) teachers recommend the students of Vedic knowledge to first offer homage to mothers as embodiments of God.

A very well-known instruction recommends that all men should see all women as mothers, as manifestations of the one Mother Goddess, the life-giver for all. In the famous song of a devotee’s dedication to

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The Hare Krishna Movement

Hare Krishna, Hare Hare, Hare Rama, Hare Hare

Celebrating Krishna by OmerArt

Introduction: Iskcon may be seen as a way of seeing life, a philosophy or a belief system that has manifested within what is referred to as Hinduism. Lord Krishna whom is celebrated was an actual person who lived some 4000 years ago and he promoted the idea of Bhakti (devotion) as a means of spiritual survival during a dark period of history.

If you have heard the mantra Hare Krishna, Hare Rama. Rama is also a historical figure who fulfilled his duty to society even though his life was made exceedingly difficult by the political climate in which he lived.

Iskon began five

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The Kama Shastra: Beyond Sex

Sexuality and the human condition in spiritual context

By Gauri Mataji Devi

Many people have heard about the Kama sutra, but generally the ideas that circulate are rather distorted, vague and confused by ignorance and prejudice. Such prejudice is mostly due to the cultural superimposition of layers of prude bigotry and self-righteous moralism brought by iconoclastic Islamic dominator’s and later by Victorian British Christians.

Enforced by the abrahamic invaders, the wholesale condemnation of the intrinsic beauty and joy of the natural form and activities of the body, effectively destroyed the Vedic expressions of beauty and joy, or covered them with the thick plaster of shame.

And that’s not simply a manner of speaking: plaster physically obliterated

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Bhagavad Gita in China

Bhagavad Gita available in Chinese

The Bhagavad Gita, the sacred ancient Indian scripture, is now available in China after its Chinese version was released during an international yoga conference held in June 2015.

Over many thousands of years China like so many other countries has benefited greatly from Hindu knowledge and wisdom. Martial arts have their origin in India as does Buddhism which played an important role in shaping Chinese life.

The Hindu influence is not so obvious in China as it is in Korea, Japan and other Asian countries as China reshaped itself during a long period of virtual isolation and its many wars. Although today modern China seems to be at odds with India as well is some

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Rajasthan

A timeless land

South west of Delhi, Rajasthan is partially desert, the colour and splendour of the local people and the place to go for camel treks.

Here you can see and even stay in old palaces, explore the famous towns of Jaiselmeer and Pushkar, or take a bus out to the temple of the rats at Bikaner.

The state capital Jaipur (Hindi: जयपुर) is popularly known as the Pink City and famous for its palaces.

Rajasthan is culturally rich and has artistic and cultural traditions which reflect the ancient Indian way of life. There is rich and varied folk culture from villages which is often depicted and is symbolic of the state. Highly cultivated classical music and dance with

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Sanatana Dharma in Bali

Intelligence in paradise

A cleansing ceremony at Sebatu, Bali

Bali is an island (state) of Indonesia and one of the worlds most popular tourist destinations. Yet while Indonesia is a secular country with the biggest Muslim population in the world, the state of Bali is almost exclusively Hindu.

It is generally thought that Buddhism arrived in Indonesia during the reign of Ashoka (269-232 B.C.E.) but there is uncertainty whether Hinduism preceded of followed Buddhism. However, given the widespread influence of Hinduism around the entire world it is most probable that Hinduism was influencing life across the Indonesian archipelago long before Buddhism arrived1.

The ancestors of today’s 4.22 million Balinese Hindus had to flee from other islands of Indonesia after

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Enlightenment

Entering the light

Enlightenment is a term especially common within Buddhism, Hinduism, Yoga and Tantra, but the idea of ‘seeing the light’ is a common expression in most cultures implying that the seer has realised something of importance.

What enlightenment means in an ultimate sense is to know the nature of existence or the meaning of life. This may sound far fetched and even irrelevant in terms of day to day living, work, paying bills, keeping up with people, gossip and struggling to survive.

This survival struggle is punctuated by moments of learning, pleasure and perhaps real joy. But so often these moments are the result of external things happening. For example people feel good on payday, they feel great

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Entrapment

And the nature of suffering

Most people at some stage in their lives, and more so if they fall into the middle and lower socio economic classes in Western society will disparage their life and experience of time passing. How often have you heard someone say that they hate their life or that they can’t wait for it to be over?

There are many reasons to take on such an attitude. When we are very young, adults tend to act very nonsensical and as such child’s minds are filled with trivia until such time as they can make sense of their world. There is a time and place to go “goo goo gaga” but very often parents do not know

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The Swastika

An ancient symbol misunderstood

Ursa Major and Ursa Minor in relation to Polaris.

The symbol of the Swastika goes back over 11,000 years and is believed to have originated in the Harappan or Pre-Harappan period and the culture of the Indus Valley Civilization. There is also a mention of the Swastika in the Vedas around the same time.

The swastika, an Indian symbol of peace and continuity came into ill repute because of the Nazi regime in Germany who took it as their emblem. But they may not have had any idea what it represented. Unfortunately most people still look on the symbol with some disgust due to this recent chapter in our history, but elsewhere in the

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A Background on Hinduism

A science embedded in culture

B. B. Vishnu discusses the myths and facts of India. Some of the dates have been revised since this video was made. The Harrappan civilisation existed before 6000 BC and the Rig Veda as old if not older. Characters like Rama and Krishna who were thought to have been mythological characters have been proved to be actual people who lived some 5000 years ago.

Theory has the ancient port city of Dwarka as being built/ occupied about 1600BC, however some think that it was submerged at the end of the last ice age when ocean levels rose. Much of history as has been learned in the West attributes a great deal to the Arabs,

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