Categories

History Matters

Like it or not, we are shaped by our history

Regardless of whether our forefathers may have been the invaders, defenders or defeated, those actions performed 100 years ago thousand years ago set in motion a chain of cause and effect (karma) that affects us today. Our past influences every aspect of our daily lives even though we are most often completely unaware.

We wonder where we came from and the origin of the universe. Was there a big bang or a big birth and an act of creation? Yet the source of creation is in every atom, every creature, and every cell of your body. If you can access it, you will know the nature of existence and your

Continue reading History Matters

Vasco Da Gama

And the sea route to India

De Gama at the Cochin court

The mainstream narrative that most of us learned in school was that Vasco de Gama was the first European to discover the sea route to India and this is still taught in many schools around the world and astonishingly in India even when it has been disproved.

But there are many untruths in history and the influence of India can can be seen across Europe and the world today. A lesser-known point is that Indian elephants did much of the heavy lifting for the Greek and Roman empires and that Asiatic lions were more likely to feature in the Roman arena than African lions as most historical

Continue reading Vasco Da Gama

Of Gods and Goddesses

In search of the elemental human

Iconography, the use of humanlike images representing aspects of the have been in use and venerated for many millennia and we are all familiar with this phenomenon regardless of birth or belief. We know from archaeological discoveries that before the development of belief systems most of these deities were depicted naked and as population increased, and beliefs developed, they became increasingly better clothed.

People continue to ask the reason why and many presume to know the answer is becoming more popularised idea that all these early deities because the statues are naked is that it was the earliest form of pornography. This idea has perverted most of the westernised thinking about the deities within

Continue reading Of Gods and Goddesses

Indus Civilisation

A mix of history and conjecture

The Indus River in modern-day Pakistan is the site of one of the worlds first ancient civilizations with evidences remaining from 9000 BCE. The most notable cities of Mohenjo-daro, Ratnagiri and Harappa which bear a high degree of resemblance to each other in urban planning and urban technologies like sewage and water supplies to all homes.

The Indus Valley Civilization (hereafter referred to as the IVC and perhaps better called Sindhu-Sarasvati civilisation) is so impressive that Wikipedia has an entire article dedicated to their inventions. The IVC developed standardized weights and measures and a system of writing. They had advanced sewer systems, showing an interest in cleanliness that most civilizations did not share. They

Continue reading Indus Civilisation

Women of India

Are Hindu women as unsafe as the media proclaims?

“Shasana Sundari”, a women writing a letter in the Jalasangi village temple in Karnataka from the period of Kalyani Chalukyas. At that time, rule was purely on Hindu principles. Muslim, Christian or western narrative did not exist. It clearly proves, women in India knew reading and writing. Image credit to Arun Bharadwaj

In so many families today, the children think they know better than the parents and in most societies believe they know more than the most highly educated. In our world of nations where it is now becoming increasingly evident that India is the mother of all nations, because India is the humble mother she is

Continue reading Women of India

The Consequences of Alcohol

And it’s impact on civilisation

Published on: 18 Aug 2016, Updated 18 Aug 2018

It’s a well established fact that alcohol dulls the senses and over a long-term period destroys brain tissue. Yet we are sensory beings and we rely on our senses to perceive the world around us as well as to make sense of that world. Therefore alcohol in effect is destroying sensitivity to life; in other words, making drinkers stupid.

Civilisation is a recognition that one belongs to a collective. So if we look at ants, each colony is a unique civilisation in a similar way to us. As human beings we all share common traits, but our sense of civilisation depends on our language and upbringing.

Continue reading The Consequences of Alcohol

Mother Theresa

Saint of fraud

Published on: 7 Sep 2016, updated 16 July 2018

Mother Teresa was a Catholic nun who many believe devoted her life to helping India’s poor and she was declared a saint in a canonization Mass held by Pope Francis in the Vatican on September 4 2016.

Because so many actually revere Mother Theresa, it can appear insensitive to fact-check her more odious pronouncements, but any journalist should check the facts and not just be a voice of the establishment as there’s more to this story.

Anjezë Gonxhe Bojaxhiu was born in August 26, 1910 in Skopje which was then part of Kosovo Vilayet in the Ottoman Empire. This was a volatile period and she lived in the shadow of the Mother Teresa

Max Muller

An anti Hindu scholarly bigot

It is true that Friedrich Max Muller, the German born philologist and Orientalist, spent most of his life studying the Vedas. It is also true that he edited and published a 51 Volume Sacred Books of the East. But few people knew that he was an employee of the East India Company who started translating the Vedas to specifically denigrate them and in so doing help to break India.

“The Christianity of our nineteenth century will hardly be the Christianity of India. But the ancient religion of India is doomed—and if Christianity does not step in, whose fault will it be?” ~ Max Muller

As he matured, he changed his views a little. But even

Continue reading Max Muller

Rembering Vlad Dracula

And his responsiveness to Muslim invasions

Is there any relevance to this historical figure, a man who has been vilified across the world as a monster, a tyrant, a bloodthirsty psychopath and of course a vampire in the realm of popular entertainment?

One must realise that troubled times breed men and women who act ‘abnormally’ to deal with the various shapes of adversity. What the teenage Vlad Țepeș (the second son of Vlad Dracul, who became the ruler of Wallachia in 1436) was dealing with were the divisions of a newly Christianised Europe and rule by fear. As Christianity took root, society became more pleasantly capitalist for some with a more clearly defined class structure or cast

Continue reading Rembering Vlad Dracula

Giving Selflessly

India : impressions of all times

“The visible world passing though the passage of time is continually changing and morphing into new forms, shapes, realities and surrealistic ideas.” We have evolved from being hunter gatherers and around the world people have evolved into a mixture of believers and seekers. The majority of people in India have always been seekers which gave rise to scientific enquiry leading to a clear understanding of the world.

At the core of this enquiry was the question “who am I?” In the modern world many people simply accept the religious or state-sponsored answer that an individual is a body and mind. But the serious Inquirer learns that body and mind physical, borrowed from the

Continue reading Giving Selflessly

Horses in Ancient India

An archaeological doubt not only being proved, but expanded to chariots and other technology

Etruscan chariot 600 BC

Horse and chariot remains have been found in India dating to 4000 BC upsetting mainstream archaeologists who say that the earliest archaeological evidence for the domestication of the horse comes from sites in Ukraine and Kazakhstan, dating to approximately 3500–4000 BC. By 3000 BC with most irrefutable evidence of domestication from sites where horse remains were interred with chariots in graves of the Sintashta and Petrovka cultures c. 2100 BC. They believe that domestication of horses only in central Asia prior to 3500 BC and that horses never set foot in India until around 1600 BC. In the Vedas, mention of horses

Continue reading Horses in Ancient India