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Myths

Myths and legends confused as history

Myth and legend’s are inspiring stories and some of them may well be factual or based on facts that as yet we cannot prove. Yet they are so often used to shape morality and justify some human behaviours. These stories are perhaps best seen as a decoration of history and not to be relied on until proven factual, but even here we must remember that the exploration of the history involves a lot of educated guesswork. Please note that this section contains factual historic information that many people misconstrue as being simply mythological.

The Swastika

An ancient symbol misunderstood

Published on: 9 Aug 2016, updated May 29 2018

Ursa Major and Ursa Minor in relation to Polaris.

The symbol of the Swastika goes back over 11,000 years and is believed to have originated in the Harappan or Pre-Harappan period and the culture of the Indus Valley Civilization. There is also a mention of the Swastika in the Vedas around the same time.

The swastika, an Indian symbol of peace and continuity came into ill repute because of the Nazi regime in Germany who took it as their emblem. But they may not have had any idea what it represented. Unfortunately most people still look on the symbol with some disgust due to this

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Questioning Life?

The why and how of being human

Most people at some point ask questions like who am I, why is life so temporary and impermanent, or other questions like what is beyond life and is there any truth to religion?

But really we must understand there is no ‘most’, there is you and the ‘most’ have either accepted the line of church, state or science because asking who am I also challenges us to question the nature of society. When I was growing up and asked this question of who we are as a collective, those who are considered wise in my community were of the opinion that we were simply here to do and die, not to have original

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The Fable of Four Wives

Metaphorical wisdom

An ancient Vedic Indian Story of a man with four wives that was at some point taken literally by some as they could never understood the essence and secret of this tale:

There was a rich man who bought and sold things, earn and lose money and a life of twists and turns, of fortunes and misfortunes; tragedies and good times. This man had four wives, he loved the fourth one very dearly, he would be lost in her charms He would adorn her with jewellery, rich dresses for her and entertain with her all the time, giving all his best. She loved him, he loved her. Both were forever thinking of each other and dint know

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The Bhagavad Gita

An extract from the worlds greatest book; The Maharbarata

Arjuna seeking answers from Lord Krishna

The Bhagavad Gita (भगवद्गीता)(often referred to as ‘the Gita’) translates as “Song of the Lord” – Gita means song and Bhagavad means God. It is an eternal message of spiritual wisdom from ancient India and a 700 verse extract from the Hindu epic scripture; The Mahabharata (chapters 23–40).

Regarded as one of the world’s most valued scriptures, the story line of Bhagavad Gita is set in the narrative framework of a dialogue between the Pandava prince Arjuna and his guide and charioteer, Lord Krishna. The conversation takes place as Arjuna faces his duty as a warrior to fight the Dharma Yudhha,

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Devi

The role of the Divine Feminine

Lalita Devi is a divine feminine archetype needing urgent and greater recognition. She is the representation of Shakti in Form. She is aliveness in the most juicy way because of her ability to facilitate the unblocked flow of life. She is Shrichakra Raja nilaya- Lalitha Devi, the divine mother.

There are many representations of Devi as the divine mother, the mother of all mothers and the creative energy of life which gives life to new life. Like all mothers, this energy desires expression in life and it also desires that all life coexist in harmony. We can see this in our mothers today are they will work their fingers to the bone and keep

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Hindu Nationalism

Deviating from mythology to truth

Portal on Mt. Agung, Bali

Whatever part of the world that you happen to live in, you are regularly lied to and misled by those who are sometimes genuine in their beliefs having been misled themselves or are being deliberately misleading for their own gain. If you would care to do the research you would find that modern civilisation is built entirely upon myths and legends that cannot be substantiated and a history that is controlled solely for the profit of a few.

One must remember that we are a people on an insignificant planet in an insignificant part of an infinitely vast universe with absolutely no connection to anywhere so we tend to

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Feminism Redefined

Celebrate the Goddess

We have lived for several thousand years as a predominantly patriarchal society creating forms of injustice that have always been apparent. Yet populations are coerced and indeed many times forced to adhere to the patriarchal and commercial ideologies that continue to govern human life.

From this injustice the woman’s movements have arisen and successfully lobbied for equal rights, but this has been limited to the physical, the material world gaining women equal opportunities and payment in the workplace along with other social and political benefits. Woman’s movements to date have done little to achieve actual woman’s liberation, they have simply opened a floodgate so they have more physical and intellectual freedom.

Like men, women are identifying

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The Sati Myth

It is said that Hindu women must throw themselves into their husbands cremation pyre

You can ask any Hindu community if they know of any woman who has done this and the answer is universally no. In fact the idea is seen as horrendous in all eyes, Hindu and otherwise. There may have been a few occasions in the distant past where this may have happened, yet it is so rare there are few records of it happening so where does this myth come from?

Before answering, it must be recognised that:

Remember the myth of the powerful priest Daksha who made a great yagna (ritual sacrifice) but did not invite his youngest daughter Sati and

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The Art of Belly Dance

Goddess Celebration and Fertility Dance

‘The Pearl Fishers’. Rene Milot. Oil on canvas. Click for larger image

Belly dance plays a number of functions within society and it has a rich history. Often referred to as Arabic dance, Oriental dancing or Exotic dancing, it’s widely believed to be an Arab dance originating in Egypt. Know one knows the exact origins although it appears to have been centred between North India, The Black Sea and North Africa. Over the millennia it has evolved to take many different forms depending on the country and region between the Mediterranean to the Pacific.

It originated as a fertility dance within cultures inspired by the joy of life and it

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Devīsūkta

Completing Saraswatī and other Devi Pujas

The Devīsūkta (Devi = Goddess and Sukta = hymn in praise), also called the Aṃbhṛnīsūkta, is the 125th sūtka occurring in the 10th mandala of the Ṛgveda. In the present day, the sūtka is popularly chanted during the worship of the Devī in the daily rituals of temples, and also in various Vedic sacrificial ceremonies like iṣti, hōma, havana etc. It is also chanted at the end of Devīmāhātmya.

The Devīsūkta is one of the most important and central texts of the Śakta-sampradāya. Written long before sectarian deity cults and philosophical schools of Vedanta, the hymn is so old we have no accurate way of dating it. Found in the Ṛgveda (10.125), and spoken

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