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HH The Dalai Lama

A promoter of peace and the path to enlightenment

His Holiness The Dalai Lama

Tenzin Gyatso - The 14th Dalai Lama

A humble man from a tumultuous background, he fled the Chinese invasion of Tibet in 1959 yet in his life and philosophy has continued unflinchingly to exhort moderation and a path of harmlessness for which he received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989.

His Holiness Tenzin Gyatso the 14th Dalai Lama is both the temporal and the spiritual leader of the Tibetan people. He frequently states that his life is guided by three major commitments: the promotion of basic human values or secular ethics in the interest of human happiness and the fostering of inter-religious harmony as well as caring for the welfare of the Tibetan people helping to facilitate the survival of their identity, culture and religion.

He is well known for his lifelong advocacy for Tibetans inside and outside Tibet who traditionally believe him to be the reincarnation of his predecessors and a manifestation of the Bodhisattva of Compassion.  Increasingly today he he encourages sanity in an insane world.

Sayings

  • The body is compared to a guest house; it is a place to stay for just a short time and not permanently. At present, the quest of consciousness is staying in the guest house of the body, like renting a place to stay. When the day comes for consciousness to leave, the guest house of the body must be left behind. Not being attached to friends, the body, wealth and possessions is the practice of the Bodhisattvas.”
  • There are two kinds of happiness - the temporary pleasure derived primarily from material comfort alone and another more enduring comfort that results from the thorough transformation and development of the mind. We can see in our own lives that the latter form of happiness is superior because when our mental state is calm and happy, we can easily put up with minor pains and physical discomforts. On the other hand, when our mind is restless and upset, the most comfortable physical facilities do not make us happy.
  • Peace isn't the mere absence of violence; peace must come from inner peace. And inner peace comes from taking others interests into account
  • Education is the proper way to promote compassion and tolerance in society. Compassion and peace of mind bring a sense of confidence that reduce stress and anxiety, whereas anger and hatred come from frustration and undermine our sense of trust. Because of ignorance, many of our problems are our own creation. Education, however, is the instrument that increases our ability to employ our own intelligence.
  • There is no need for temples, no need for complicated philosophies. My brain and my heart are my temples; my philosophy is kindness.
  • A compassionate attitude helps you communicate more easily with your fellow human beings. As a result, you make more genuine friends and the atmosphere around you is more positive, which gives you greater inner strength. This inner strength helps you spontaneously concern yourself with others, instead of thinking only about yourself.
  • Disturbing emotions not only disturb our own state of mind, they also disturb the minds of others. Self-centredness gives rise to fear and insecurity, which in turn creates distrust. This is why having an altruistic attitude brings a great sense of happiness and peace of mind.
  • Peace has a great deal to do with warm-heartedness and respect for the lives of others, avoiding doing them harm and regarding their lives as being as precious as our own. If, on that basis, we can also be of help to others, so much the better.
  • Every one of us is getting older, which is a natural process. Time is constantly moving on, second by second. Nothing can stop it, but what we can do is use our time properly; that is in our hands. Whether we believe in a spiritual tradition or not, we need to use our time meaningfully. If over days, weeks, months and years, we have used our time in a meaningful way – when our last day comes, we'll be happy, we'll have no regrets.
  • The practice of patience guards us against losing our presence of mind. It enables us to remain undisturbed, even when the situation is really difficult. It gives us a certain amount of inner peace, which allows us some self-control, so that we can choose to respond to situations in an appropriate and compassionate manner, rather than being driven by our disturbing emotions.
  • The quality of everything we do: our physical actions, our verbal actions, and even our mental actions, depends on our motivation. That's why it's important for us to examine our motivation in our day to day life. If we cultivate respect for others and our motivation is sincere, if we develop a genuine concern for others well-being, then all our actions will be positive.
  • It is vital that young people, the guardians of our future, develop a strong awareness of the futility of violence and war. They can learn from the examples of Mahatma Gandhi and Martin Luther King, Jr., that non-violence is the best way to ensure peace in the long term. Because the twentieth century was a century of violence, let us make the twenty-first a century of dialogue.
  • Every morning when I wake up, I dedicate myself to helping others to find peace of mind. Then, when I meet people, I think of them as long term friends; I don't regard others as strangers.
  • Kindness and a good heart are the foundation for success in this life, progress on the spiritual path, and the fulfillment of our aspirations. Our need for them is not limited to any specific time, place, society, or culture.
  • We are, you might say, “brainwashed” into thinking that money is the source of happiness, while what we really need to know is that inner peace is something that comes from within.

On site talks
An Introduction to Buddhism
Science and Buddhism conference

Books
Buddhism and Books by and about His Holiness

Visit the official Dalai Lama Website,
The Dalai Lama on Facebook or
The Dalai Lama on twitter.

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